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HOLLY KOZELSKY: In support of quiet boredom

HOLLY KOZELSKY: In support of quiet boredom

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Holly Kozelsky

Holly Kozelsky

An underrated art is being bored.

When we were kids, we were bored a lot. Being bored is no fun, but it builds constitution.

It teaches you initiative. It teaches you different ways of finding various things to do and doing them.

We learned to sit there and wait. We had to play at our own things. We picked up books and read them. Some of us learned to love reading because of it.

If we would complain to Mom that we were bored, we would find ourselves in other room with the furniture polish and a rag, or perhaps with the math flash cards.

That taught us not to complain about being bored, because there was no telling what ways our parents would find to keep us occupied – which usually had nothing to do with fun.

Kids today don’t know what it is to be bored and to while away the hours. In fact, many of us adults have lost that ability, too.

We can go on and on with “back when I was a kid” stories, but lately I’ve been noticing this problem in my own life.

For most of my adult life I’ve been perfectly content to go around my household chores with the radio playing in the background for company.

Then it turned to podcasts. Hours spent doing chores or projects meant fascinating stories or educational reports filling my mind, thanks to podcasts.

How in the world did I start to become bored with podcasts? Apparently I’ve listened to so dang many of them that I’ve gone through all the interesting topics and am stuck on really obscure ones I have to try hard to appreciate.

These electronic devices we have in our pockets or at our bedsides or in our hands have ruined us. Their constant chatter or tunes or clicks have made us deaf to the peaceful silence or the simplicity of a song on the radio.

They have turned us off from the rest of the world.

They have turned us off from ourselves.

Holly Kozelsky is a writer for the Martinsville Bulletin; contact her at 276-638-8801 ext. 243.

Holly Kozelsky is a writer for the Martinsville Bulletin; contact her at 276-638-8801 ext. 243.

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